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faq:techies02 [2011/04/30 18:57] (current)
clemens created
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 +<​code>​
 +[02] HOW DO I CONFIGURE MY ENVIRONMENT SETTINGS AT LOGIN?
  
 +     This file (.profile) is already setup for you with some generic defaults.
 +     In the file you will find information on customizing your session. ​ You
 +     can edit the file directly using an editor (emacs, ed, vi or pico). ​ Note
 +     that any changes to the file effect future login sessions.
 +
 +     --- UNIX Shell HACKS ---
 +
 +     If you are using the UNIX Bourne Shell or Korn Shell, you need to
 +     be aware of the "​.profile"​ file in your home directory. ​ This acts
 +     as an init file by setting up various environment variables and
 +     ​such. ​ If a "​.kshrc"​ file is present and you are using the Korn
 +     ​Shell,​ then those variables, functions and aliases will also be
 +     ​loaded.
 +
 +     [ ENV SETTINGS ]
 +
 +     A typical .profile looks much like this:
 +
 +         ​MAIL=/​usr/​mail/​$LOGNAME
 +         ​TERM=vt100
 +         ​LINES=24
 +         ​COLUMNS=80
 +         ​EDITOR=/​bin/​ed
 +         ​VISUAL=/​usr/​bin/​vi
 +         HZ=60
 +
 +         ​PS1="​$ "
 +         ​PS2=">​ "
 +
 +         stty erase '​^h'​ intr '​^c'​ echoe
 +
 +         ​export MAIL TERM LINES COLUMNS EDITOR VISUAL HZ
 +
 +     For both the Bourne and Korn shells, the default for PS1 is "​$"​.
 +     If you'd rather have the current directory for your prompt, here
 +     is a ksh hack to do it.  Put this function in your .kshrc file.
 +
 +         chdir ()
 +         {
 +            \cd ${*:-$HOME} ** PS1="​$(pwd)>​ "
 +         }
 +
 +         alias cd=chdir
 +
 +     ​Another way of doing this without defining a function and alias
 +     would be a hack on the PS1 environment variable itself:
 +
 +         ​PS1=['​$?:​${PWD#​${PWD%/​*/​*/​*}/​}>​ '
 +
 +     This hack also gives you the return code for the last command executed.
 +
 +     For the novice user, both of these are useful. ​ Being able to make
 +     ​aliases like:
 +
 +          alias dir=ls -xsFb
 +
 +     make using UNIX a little bit easier.
 +
 +     To get a list of processes currently being run by your userid, type:
 +
 +          ps -U $LOGNAME
 +    ​
 +     If you have a process running that you wish to terminate (but don't
 +     have a TTY associated with it) get the pid, then use the kill command:
 +
 +          kill -HUP      (other signals include -9)
 +</​code>​
 +
 +[[techies|back]]